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Android obesity at diagnosis and breast carcinoma survival: Evaluation of the effects of anthropometric variables at diagnosis, including body composition and body fat distribution and weight gain during life span,and survival from breast carcinoma
Kumar, N. B., Cantor, A., Allen, K., Cox, C. E. Cancer. 2000. 88:12, 2751-7.
Topic area
Body size
Study design
Prospective cohort
Funding agency
Not reported
Study Participants
Number of Cases
83 breast cancer mortalities
Menopausal Status
The menopausal status of women included in this study is listed here.
Pre menopausal
Post menopausal
Number in Cohort
Cohort: 166 women with breast carcinoma
Cohort participation rate
Retention/participation exceeded 70% for exposed a
Participant selection: Inclusion and exclusion criteria
Criteria used to select participants in the study.
In: women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma; participated in a case-control study at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute; had not been treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy of chemotherapy Ex: pregnancy; weight loss of more than 10% of usual weight; engaged in a dietary or therapeutic regimen for weight loss during the year preceding the study; on a cholesterol lowering therapeutic regimen; limited by physical stature or a medical condition that prevented researchers from obtaining accurate skinfold measurements
Comment about participation selection
Strengths: Anthropometric measurements were obtained by trained staff at diagnosis; weight histories from patients in the cohort at ages 16, 20, 30, and 40 years were obtained; extensive follow-up of 10 years through annual or more frequent contact; recurrence was confirmed by clinical or pathologic assessment; survival status obtained from the cancer center's tumor registry; analyzed breast cancer survival by Quatelet index (BMI), weight at 30 years and suprailiac: thigh ratio; one of the first studies to systematically examine the association of fat distribution and adult weight gain by breast cancer survival; analyzed many exposures Limitations: Small cohort with few breast cancer mortality patients; results not stratified by menopausal status or age; does not state when study began
Exposures investigated
Suprailiac:thigh ratio, weight at age 30, Quatelet index (BMI), weight at diagnosis, body fat percentage, body surface area, height, triceps, biceps subscapular, suprailac, abdomen, thigh skinfolds, and waist and hip circumferences
How exposure was measured
Questionnaire Anthropometric measurement, researcher-administered
Breast cancer outcome investigated
Breast cancer recurrence or progression
Ethnic groups with separate analysis
If this study provided a separate analysis by ethnic or racial group, the groups are listed here.
No
Confounders considered
Other breast cancer risk factors, such as family history, age at first birth, and hormone replacement therapy use, that were taken into account in the study.
Adequately controlled, Confounders: stage of disease
Genetic characterization included
If the study analyzed relationships between environmental factors and inherited genetic variations, this field will be marked “Yes.” “No”, if not.
No
Strength of associations reported
Android body fat distribution, indicated by high suprailac:thigh ratio was a statistically significant prognostic indicator for survival, HR=2.6(1.63-4.17) trend p<0.001
Weight at age 30 was also a statistically significant prognostic indicator for survival, HR=1.15(1.01-1.28) trend p=0.036
Quetlet index had a negatively significant prognostic indicator for survival, HR=0.92(0.87-0.98) trend p=0.07
Results Comments
Weight at diagnosis, body fat percentage, body surface area, height, triceps, biceps subscapular, suprailac, abdomen, thigh skinfolds, and waist and hip circumferences showed no significant relation to survival Follow-up: more than ten years.
Author address
Department of Nutrition, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, University of South Florida, Tampa 33612-9497, USA.
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